Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

What is Hinduism? Beautifully Explained by a Non-Indian.



One of the best explanation of Hinduism I've ever heard. She is so clear in her expressions and has grasped the essentials of this religion.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Word Play

These Words Have Something in Common, WHAT? Banana Dresser Grammar Potato Revive Uneven Assess

Sunday, August 6, 2017

video
This brought tears to my eyes. Would you believe it, some 2, 583 people don't like this story. What do you call them?

Friday, August 4, 2017

A Helping Hand

     I was in Japan during this April and I had a pleasant experience. We, my wife and I, came back from Nara to Tokyo (where we were based) at around 11:00 p.m. It was raining heavily and though it was just a walking distance to the hotel that we were put up, we decided to take a taxi. We had to cross the road to flag one, but none would stop; there were only a few of them passing. I then saw a young boy with an umbrella standing and I asked him if there was a taxi stand nearby. He told me that there wasn't and went out in the rain to try and flag one down. He couldn't and so he came back and showed us a traffic signal nearby and said that we might be able to catch one that stops for a red light. He came along with us to the signal and in spite of our refusal, insisted on giving us his umbrella and left. The Japanese are very helpful.
     There was also another incident of such a kind when, at one of the places that we went of visit we couldn't locate a restroom. There was an old lady in a shop to whom we asked if there was one nearby. She immediately left the shop (she was running it all by herself), took us to the nearest restroom which was some 100 meters or more and then left. I doubt if anybody anywhere else would have done such a thing.
     Most of the places that we visited were temples and here are some pictures that I took.


























Here is a picture of a Just Married couple.


The English Language

I take it you already know of tough and bough and cough and dough.
Others may stumble but not you, on hiccough, thorough, tough and through.
Well done! And now you wish perhaps to learn of less familiar traps?
Beware of heard, a dreadful word that looks like beard and sounds like bird.
And dead -- it's said like bed, not bead -- For goodness' sake, don't call it deed.
Watch out for meat and great and threat, (they rhyme with suite and straight and debt)
A moth is not a moth in mother, nor both in bother, broth in brother.
And here is not a match for there, nor dear and fear or bear and pear.
And then there's dose and rose and lose, just look them up -- goose and choose
and cork and work and card and ward and front and font, and word and sword,
and do and go, and wart and cart -- Come, come! I've hardly made a start!
A dreadful language? Man alive!

I mastered it when I was five!

A Riddle

Can you guess the answer to this riddle: 
     "I am a wondrous creature: to women a thing of joyful expectation, to close-lying companions serviceable. I harm no city-dweller excepting my slayer alone. My stem is erect and tall––I stand up in bed––and whiskery somewhere down below. Sometimes a countryman's quite comely daughter will venture, bumptious girl, to get a grip on me. She assaults my red self and seizes my head and clenches me in a cramped place. She will soon feel the effect of her encounter with me, this curl-locked woman who squeezes me. Her eye will be wet."
     It is not what you think might it is and it is something quite unexpected. This is a double-entendre.
     This is the 25th. riddle in the "Exter Book" of "Codex exoniensis" in the Exter Cathedral in England.  It may also interest you to know that the title of Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" is a pun on the Elizabethan use of "no-thing" which is a slang word.
     An example of a bawdy double-entendre is in the James Bond movie "Tomorrow Never Dies" where Moneypenny at a certain point of time points out that Bond is "a cunning linguist". It also comes across in the movie "The World is not Enough"  where James Bond tells Dr. Christmas Jones "I thought Christmas comes only once." The double-entendre is evident only if you see the situation when he tells her that.
     Bond movies have a lot of sexual innuendo in them.
     In music, you have this song with the title "If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body Would You Hold It Against Me"  by the Bellamy Brothers.